Proud of Greenwich’s Thames Path? The ‘royal’ borough isn’t


Of course, it’s almost a heresy in the “royal” borough to criticise something at the Dome O2, but that’s not stopped this website before…

Anyway, take one two-bob crap club which can’t be arsed to clear up its’ punters’ junk, and add to that a local council which can’t be arsed to sweep its streets properly, and combine with a glorious spring Sunday.

The result – scores of people walking and cycling along the Thames Path, somewhere which makes you feel lucky to be from this corner of London, and finding it’s covered with rubbish from the Proud2 club.

Ladies free? Tim Westwood*? Classy. Still, it’s at the O2 so it’s got to be brilliant, eh?

(* video may be unsuitable for work viewing. Tim Westwood is 54 years old.)

23 comments

  1. (Sigh) I’ll get on to someone about it – last week a cleansweep team had to come out on Sunday to clear mess on the other side of the Peninsula from whatever-it-calls-itself-now-but-just-dumps-junk-where-it-likes club. To be honest there are several organisations in that area who are supposed to clear litter. Need to check.

  2. That’s because it started out as a Lewisham Council initiative called Love Lewisham. It also has a very nifty app, LoveCleanStreets, which reports back on when the job’s done.

    In Greenwich, you have to email a contact centre who take up to three days to get back to you (although you can use the LCS app).

  3. A couple of weekends ago the same bit of path was also strewn with rubbish so not a one off. Why should cleansweep be needed? Surely the venue should have to clean up after their punters – they do a good enough job on peninsula square and this must be part of their licensing conditions…

  4. Omar has got a point.

    The venue and the organisers will have made a pretty penny out of all this, they should either clean up the shite themselves or pay the council to do it.

  5. I used to live in the US and so have quite a few American friends visit. It is the one thing they are most surprised about – just how much litter there is here. When walking the dog I always take an extra carrier bag to pick up rubbish but really Cleansweep should be doing a better job. The verges along the A2 are particularly bad.

  6. I used to live in Singapore….no problems there!

    But seriously, in Singapore there is a litter bin every 50 yards, and they’re used. They even have little ash trays attached to them for your fag butts.

    There’s no need to litter.

    But sadly whatever is done I’m afraid there are still pig inorant people around like the woman I saw the other day on Woolwich Road who slowed down, disposed of her McDonalds litter out of the (passenger) window, and then drove on.

    Hag!

  7. Mary

    Can’t effective litter picking after each of the clubs events be made part of the clubs license? Oh, hang on, can’t we now object to the clubs license because of litter and associated nuisance?

  8. I will come back properly when I get more info – but – briefly – yes litter clearance is frequently made part of licence arrangements – which is one reason why I have been a bit hesitant here because I am not sure who should be doing what yet.

  9. and also – ps – I can check again but I more than suspect the verges of a lot of the motorway areas are down to Transport for London to clear.

  10. I detect a theme developing here with your recent posts Darryl.

    There is no doubt about it East Greenwich and the immediate area is bloody filthy. It’s the single one thing I hate about living here and I’ve been going on about it for years.

    As MM points out, things are not helped by the fact that a large part of the problem area around the Woolwich Road roundabout is the responsibility of TFL.

    That still does not excuse the fact that the area around East Greenwich shops, Christchurch Way, Blackwall Lane, Woolwich Road, Horn Lane, Bugsby’s Way is disgusting. As I’ve said before I’m ashamed to bring people over.

    Graffiti, takeaway litter, flytips, abandoned shopping trolleys, weeds, filthy kerb sides. East Greenwich has it all. Perhaps the Royal Borough expects residents to put on high viz vests and pick up our broomsticks (see latest edition of Greenwich Time)?

  11. This is all very refreshing to read. I was starting to become a little concerned that my loathing of the omnipresent litter was an irrational over-reaction. I personally reserve my loudest inner-scream for the drinks cans and fast food wrappers being dumped within feet of a bin.

    Can we get Community Payback involved in litter clearance or move some of the council wardens from the centre to patrol Trafalgar Road/Woolwich Road?

    How about we direct smokers and gum chewers to drop their left-overs in the gutter instead of the pavement?

  12. What we mustn’t forget, however, is that all this litter is generated by people and not the council Attitudes need to change..

  13. I know it’s not the council’s fault there are so many thoughtless disgusting slobs around these parts (East Greenwich), but they must be aware of how bad it is around here (surely someone must do analysis of the cleansweep call centre database).

    I honestly do not mind picking up litter in the immediate area outside my house but I’ll be damned if I’m going to sweep the whole bloody road.

  14. Has the council cut back on rubbish bins in the past year or so? I’m pretty sure there used to be one near the bus stop at Roan Street in West Greenwich. If so, and if they think they’re saving money, I suspect that’s a delusion. We need more bins.

    Gordon, I agree with your comment about picking up litter near your house. If more of us (including small-shopkeepers) did that, it would establish a precedent. If rubbish were seen as “our” problem, rather than just “theirs” (the council’s), people might gradually change their habits. (I’m not talking about the mess in Darryl’s photo, of course.)

  15. The trouble is with seeing rubbish as “our” problem and not “theirs”, though, is that we accept it is our problem by delegating to and paying the council to clean it on our behalf. If they’ve given up collecting rubbish properly, then maybe we should have a cut in council tax. Google the “broken windows theory” if you don’t know of it.

    (My own thought is that the slow erosion of basic services in Greenwich has everything to do with years of council tax freezes – as well as blowing money on booze for councillors, propaganda newspapers, horsey centres in Shooters Hill, and other adventures.)

  16. I am reading all this. I have recently had offers of support from various organisations from outside the borough for ‘community cleanups’ .
    I am also very aware of heroic individuals who put a lot of effort in to keeping small areas clean – unasked and frequently unthanked. And we need to remember that staff and managers are also working very very hard.
    So – in continuing to think of what to do – its maybe about working together. Perhaps my role at least can be as a conduit through to management.

  17. The trouble is, Mary, is the communication’s all one way. We hear nothing from the council other than its PR guff (the Dear Leader and a broom, the Dear Leader and a spade, the Dear Leader with kids, a broom and a spade). There’s little acknowledgement of our concerns – in fact, they’re usually dismissed.

    On a practical level, if something’s reported to Cleansweep, it often takes 3 days to get through the contact centre, and then there’s nothing to let us know when the job’s been done.

  18. It is not just an East Greenwich thing, and it’s also very little to do with the availability of bins. Most days I walk my dog up The Point where there are a plethora of bins yet I still spend the first ten minutes picking up beer cans and cigarette packets that have just been chucked on the ground. It is anti social behaviour. The bins provide the carrot but maybe people need a bit of stick to use them.

  19. I can only do what I can do myself as a backbencher – I do try and take up every issue that is brought to me and run with it until I get something done – although I don’t always succeed. That includes big issues as well as little ones.

  20. The car park at North Greenwich has been covered in broken glass, empty booze bottles and rain-sodden club fliers the last few times I’ve been through it. Pretty depressing.

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