Greenwich Time: Council leader mocks ‘shut it down’ petition

Images of Greenwich Council leader Denise Hyland feature three times in this week's Greenwich Time, the last before the council has to abide by strict election impartiality rules
Images of Greenwich Council leader Denise Hyland feature three times in this week’s Greenwich Time, the last before the council has to abide by strict election impartiality rules. Four cabinet members also feature.

Greenwich Council leader Denise Hyland has mocked the the number of signatures on a petition calling for the closure of its weekly newspaper Greenwich Time, saying: “I didn’t know the Tories and Liberal Democrats had so many members.”

Hyland also predicted other boroughs would join Greenwich’s judicial review into communities secretary Eric Pickles’ order demanding the council closes the controversial weekly.

The petition, started last Thursday by Stewart Christie – a Liberal Democrat candidate in last year’s council election – had gained 106 signatures ahead of last night’s full council meeting, the last before 7 May’s general election.

Responding to a question from Conservative group leader Spencer Drury, Hyland launched into a defence of the paper that lasted nearly seven minutes, reiterating the council’s claim that GT actually saves it money.

“Our advice from our QC is that the Secretary of State has acted illegally, and that is why we are applying to the court to judicially review the decision,” she said.

“And as for the people who set up the website ‘cease Greenwich Time publication now’, which I believe has 106 [signatures] on it – given the Tories and Lib Dems seem to have formed a coalition around Greenwich Time, I didn’t know they had so many members,” Hyland added to laughter from her own councillors.

Hyland also refused to give details of costs for the judicial review when pressed by Conservative deputy leader Matt Hartley.

“Essentially, I don’t think we’ll lose. I think we have a strong case, and in addition I fully expect other boroughs to join in on that JR [judicial review]. That would be my expectation,” she said.

Pressed again for a “worst case scenario” figure, she added: “We’ll wait and see what the lawyers say it will cost us, but obviously, it will not cost us a penny when we win.”

Hyland’s confidence may be explained by Greenwich sharing its Greenwich Time printing contract with eight other boroughs – Brent, Havering, Hackney, Hounslow, Newham, Redbridge, Tower Hamlets and Waltham Forest, who all use Trinity Mirror to print a variety of council publications.

Of these, Hackney, Newham and Waltham Forest have been given until the end of April to close their fortnightly publications – Hackney Today, Newham Mag and Waltham Forest News.

The general election – with its “purdah” rules on public bodies making controversial decisions – complicates matters, but Pickles’ direction states that Greenwich must not produce more than four council publications in the year from 31 March. This means the weekly GT would not breach the order until late April – giving other councils plenty of time to join in any legal action.

Tower Hamlets' East End Life is the only other weekly council newspaper. Its fate lies with the council's commissioners.
Tower Hamlets’ East End Life is the only other weekly council newspaper. Its fate lies with the council’s commissioners.

The Tower Hamlets question

Earlier, Hyland had questioned why Tower Hamlets Council – which is being partly-run by commissioners sent in by Pickles following allegations of malpractice – was still being allowed to publish England’s only other weekly council publication, East End Life.

“I find it extraordinary that Eric Pickles has sent commissioners into Tower Hamlets, yet Tower Hamlets is still producing East End Life on a weekly basis.

“The commissioner himself has even put an article in there,” she said to laughter.

“They haven’t had a notice, they haven’t had a direction,” she added.

In fact, Pickles did begin the process of taking action against East End Life in September, although has pulled back since sending commissioners into Tower Hamlets in December.

As for the article by a commissioner, East End Life merely reported a decision by Sir Ken Knight in its 16 March issue – he didn’t write a piece for it.

The situation with Tower Hamlets and East End Life may become clearer in the coming weeks, as Sir Ken and colleague Max Casey were given three months to draw up a plan to rectify the problems with Tower Hamlets – including a “plan for publicity”.

Asked by Spencer Drury (hear audio above) if Greenwich would close GT if Tower Hamlets closed East End Life, Hyland said: “Look, we all have choices about things and it’s this Labour administration’s choice to inform the public of different events and publish our statutory adverts that the government still say need to be published in the press. Essentially, its our choice to do that and we think it’s the most cost-effective way.

“There may be a few people – and we know who they are – who don’t agree with that. And you’re entitled to your opinion.”

“But you’re not in charge of the council,” she added, to laughter from her Labour colleagues.

No research into households without internet

After she used the “digital divide” as a justification for publishing GT, Hyland was asked what research the council had done into households without internet access. She only said this was work for “our digital centre” to take on.

She added: “What we do know is that vast numbers of people head to our public libraries to use the IT that’s there, and how valued that is. And I know from the people who go into my surgery – and I’m sure that’s relicated right around this chamber – that many people may have an email address but they don’t have broadband, and therefore they have to come into these facilities.

“With the amount of money this council has to save we will promote more and more online, but at the same time, we will do everything we can do lower that digital divide and make sure people have access to the web.”

Low newspaper distribution

Hyland also pointed out the low circulation of the News Shopper and Mercury titles in the borough.

“In Charlton, only 63 homes get the Mercury, so 99% of Charlton don’t get the Mercury,” she said.

“Greenwich – less than 1% get the Mercury, 99% don’t get it. Eltham – 88% don’t get it. Blackheath – three-quarters don’t get it. Abbey Wood – more than two-thirds don’t get it. And the News Shopper’s similar.”

Hyland also claimed there were small businesses in Greenwich borough that “just will not pay for adverts in the independent press – whereas they can buy space in Greenwich Time that is a lot cheaper”.

“And also we don’t use massage parlours. We don’t advertise those, and thank goodness, and we would find it hard to give our business to organisations that include adverts in that way.”

Neither the Mercury nor the News Shopper were present in Woolwich Town Hall last night to report on proceedings.

New to this? See a brief history of Greenwich Time as well as how the issue could be solved tomorrow.

6 comments

  1. “Local media capitalists can’t be arsed to report own astroturf campaign”.
    That would be a better headline for this piece, given its final sentence: “Neither the Mercury nor the News Shopper were present in Woolwich Town Hall last night to report on proceedings.”
    Put another way, a handful of ConDem coalition supporters are taking time out from the general election (fair enough — they know they won’t win in Greenwich) to act as PR hacks for private firms that want to charge higher ad rates to support zero news coverage. (Come to think of it, that is indeed not news … )

  2. Just a quick comment to quash a few of the untruths from Hyland’s comments:-

    1. This isn’t some crazy Conservative / Liberal Democrat conspiracy against the council. The petition has been signed by members of all parties and none, including members of Greenwich Labour.

    2. It also isn’t “electioneering”. There’s no mention of any political party in the petition and far from Labour or Greenwich Council bashing it also clearly states that, “we also believe the council does many good things which would be covered by the local press regardless. By continuing to publish a one-sided view of the borough, and following a path of legal action, you will do more harm to your reputation than good.”

    How would people feel if the National Government of the day published a newspaper with only one side of the argument, only featuring cabinet ministers, and it was delivered free to every household out of general taxation? There would be uproar.

    Also, despite the fact that “neither the Mercury nor the News Shopper were present in Woolwich Town Hall last night to report on proceedings” it’s worth noting that a reporter from Greenwich Time has never been spotted either. I wonder who writes the articles?

  3. How dare the Leader make assumptions about my politics. I am neither a Conservative nor a LibDem supporter. What I do object to is (i) my Council Tax funding propaganda and (ii) practically every article featuring a “Cabinet Member” taking credit for something on which they have had minimal or, frequently, absolutely no influence. During its very short life, the petition attracted 106 votes, it is true. However, Ms Hyland should take the opportunity to evesdrop on conversations or follow local social media to find out what local people really think about the publication. It would be an uncomfortable experience. I have long heard it referred to as the Enva Hoxha Newsletter amongst council staff and, in particular, local Labour Party activists, which says it all.

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