New Capital Quay: Insurer to pay out over ‘Grenfell’ fire risk cladding

New Capital Quay
New Capital Quay has similar cladding to that used in Grenfell Tower

The firm that insured the flammable cladding on west Greenwich’s New Capital Quay development is to pay to have it removed, ending over a year of uncertainty for its 2,000 residents, who feared being lumbered with paying the bill themselves.

Residents of the 980 homes were stuck in a squabble between developer Galliard Homes and the National House-Building Council (NHBC), which insured the building – and inspected the work when it was completed – over who should pay for the cladding to be removed.

The cladding is the same type that is believed to have helped the fire at Grenfell Tower in North Kensington spread so quickly, resulting in the deaths of 71 people in June 2017.

Now NHBC has accepted a claim from Galliard for the cost of removing the cladding – which was estimated earlier this year at between £19 million and £40 million.

Local MP Matt Pennycook, who has raised the issue several times in the House of Commons, called it “fantastic news for all residents”.

A statement issued by NHBC on Monday afternoon said: “As the warranty insurance provider at New Capital Quay, NHBC has investigated a claim under our policy and we can confirm that we have accepted this claim.

“This has been a highly complex process and residents have understandably been concerned. We have made every effort to ensure they have been kept informed throughout the process and residents can now be assured that they will not have to bear the costs of the work.

“We are working closely with the managing agents Property Management Matters Ltd(PMML) and Galliard Homes and we will all keep residents updated with progress.”

The 12-block development by Deptford Creek was built by Galliard Homes and opened in 2013 and 2014. In February, NHBC said it is down to PMML, the Galliard subsidiary, which manages New Capital Quay to prove that the development did not meet building regulations in force at the time of construction.

Residents believe it is the largest housing development in the UK affected by the need to replace unsafe cladding, and fire wardens have been making round-the-clock inspections of the blocks.

853 was the first local media outlet in Greenwich to feature the residents’ plight back in February. The case has also had London and national coverage, such as this report from ITV London.

Residents had also taken their plight to Greenwich Council, though complained that the authority had left them “fighting alone” before eventually securing a meeting with former leader Denise Hyland in March.

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